As I am writing this Editor’s Note it is Oct. 18, and there are 67 days until Christmas. Predictably the Christmas displays have already found their way into many retail outlets.

The other day I saw boxes of candy canes next to bags of candy corn on the grocery store shelf. I also observed a pumpkin patch with Christmas trees stacked in the back corner, just waiting to be transitioned to a tree lot as soon as the final trick-or-treater goes home. My wife even asked me last night if it was too early to order our Christmas fruit baskets for delivery to our friends.

“It’s only mid-October!” I said.

Ironically, however, the first gift basket of holiday treats from one of our vendors was delivered to my office this morning. I’m certain the thoughtful, early gift was intended to catch my attention ahead of the wave of holiday greetings and gifts that come between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Well, mission accomplished.

In addition to outstripping every other holiday gift-giver, the sender of today’s treats did me another meaningful favor. I began my annual commitment to avoid overindulging in sinful snacks this season a few weeks earlier than normal.

Notice the use of the word “overindulge,” as opposed to simply “indulge.” I certainly don’t want to give the mistaken impression that I plan to spend my holidays eating nothing but celery sticks and raw broccoli. There isn’t anything holidayish about that! I do, however, commit to be careful.

Experience has shown me that one way to stay committed to a goal is to share it with others. Hopefully, sharing this goal with the readers of Community magazine will help me stick to my guns. So, if we happen to see each other during the holidays, feel free to ask how I’m doing.

Don’t stop me, or give me a disapproving look, if you see me indulging in a small portion of fudge, eggnog, fruitcake or even a small piece of pie. But if I reach for a second or third treat, feel free to say something.

Naturally, I will allow myself a couple of free days, including Thanksgiving. After all, it’s nearly impossible to put on a sizeable amount of weight from one day

of overindulgence. Even my limited knowledge of nutrition has taught me that you have to consume an extra 3,500 calories to put on a pound of weight. (If your scale edges up a pound or two after a meal, it’s most likely due to water retention from eating extra carbohydrates or sodium.)

So when I overdo it on, say, Thanksgiving, cut me some slack. I promise to be on my best behavior every other day. At least I promise to try.

 

Happy Holidays!

Rob Brough

Executive Vice President

Corporate Marketing and Communications