Community

Editor's Note

Capturing Great Memories

Rob Brough May 1, 2019

I have three “little” brothers. In reality, I may be the littlest of the four, but that’s a topic for another column.

As is common with most sibling relationships, we share many interests. At the same time, however, we also have our own unique interests and aptitudes.

My brother, Jeff, rides a motorcycle and is a master barbecue chef. My brother, Mike, can fix anything and negotiate his way into just about anywhere. My littlest brother, Steve, is an exceptional photographer. He’s so good, in fact, that he dabbles in it as a side gig to his day job as a banker (see stevenbroughphotography.com).

A few years ago, I decided I wanted to take advantage of his knowledge and acquire some photographic skills. This quest, of course, began with the acquisition of a “real” camera.

I quickly learned, however, that having quality equipment alone doesn’t do the trick. In fact, for several months, the only setting I used on my Nikon D7100 was auto. I may as well have kept using my iPhone, because my phone pictures were far better than my camera photos.

The real improvement came when my brothers and I decided to plan an annual (and sometimes semiannual) trip to Southern Utah for some brother time and photographic instruction.

In addition to the thrill of arising at 3:30 a.m. to beat the sunrise at Zion National Park, Snow Canyon or Lower Antelope Canyon, and hiking in the darkness with a headlamp to just the right spot, I learned a lot from my free classes.

I learned about aperture, shutter speed and ISO. I learned about framing and composition. Admittedly, I forgot much of it shortly after returning home from my bonding time with my brothers, but it always comes back.

To borrow and modify a line from the Disney film “Ratatouille,” “Anyone can take great photos.” You just have to spend a little time at it.

In this issue of Community, Mary Harper and Jens Nielsen offer up a few simple tips for improving the quality of our photos and thereby capture and preserve the emotion, magnitude and feeling of the important moments in our lives.

Interestingly, my quest to become a better photographer has resulted in creating memorable experiences for me and my brothers, which I am now better equipped to capture.

Here’s to more great memories and better photos.

Rob Brough  Executive Vice President  Corporate Marketing and Communications

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