Business

Small Business Success Story: CinDWood Crafts

Quality over quantity is Cindy Clyde’s mantra, and it’s earned her custom knitting looms a loyal and growing following.

Nicola McIntosh Jun 18, 2018

Cindy Clyde’s business got its start at the state fair, of all places. Her custom knitting looms had earned blue ribbons, so she brought two sets to a local craft store on consignment. The next day, the store ordered 350 of the looms, and the rest is history.

CinDWood Craft looms are known in the industry as “the Cadillac looms” because they prioritize quality over quantity, and they come in the widest variety of different sizes and designs in the world.

“I am proud of the product we create. I could have outsourced it and done them more cheaply, but I didn’t want to go that route,” Clyde says. “I made a niche by making them more durable and a little bit higher-end product that people seem to be loving.”

The home-based business operates out of Clyde’s basement, where they glue every peg by hand. It’s a family affair, with her daughter designing looms and her sister Kristy Hunter focusing on marketing. Sales have increased more than five-fold, and Clyde credits a lot of the company’s growth to Kristy.

Group photo of the CinDWood staff gathered together
The CinDWood staff went pink in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month and owner Cindy Clyde’s mother, a 34-year breast cancer survivor. From left, Jessica King, Wendy Williams, Nikki Zimmerman, Cindy Clyde, Cindy’s mother JenaVee Smith and sister Kristy Hunter.

“I do great talking on phone and customer service, she does great on the marketing and design side,” Clyde says. “If you want to grow, you need to be willing to find someone who has the personality and the knowledge who can be strong where you’re weak.”

As a registered nurse, Clyde says, “I can work on somebody bleeding and injured and not bat an eye at all. But I get on the computer to find Facebook or to upload something to the website, and I’m lost, so that’s not my asset, but my sister is amazing at it.”

As the company has grown, it has relied on several small business resources, including a U.S. Small Business Administration loan from Zions Bank. “The first loan we did was to purchase material and help make sure we had enough for payroll if we had a slow month,” Clyde says.

They also received free counseling from the Small Business Development Center at Utah Valley University. “I didn’t even know it existed – that was huge,” Clyde says. “We were able to take our paperwork over and sit one-to-one with someone and they could make more sense of what we had, which was out of our scope as a small business.” 

Zions Bank Offers Support for Entrepreneurs

In addition to SBA loans, Zions offers financing for small businesses including credit cards, term loans, lines of credit and equipment leasing, plus checking and savings accounts. Our Business Payments and Technology products and services can help your business optimize cash flow, streamline disbursements and reduce risk.

Zions Bank offers a wealth of resources for entrepreneurs, including Business Resource Centers in Utah and Idaho. The centers help aspiring, new or existing business owners start, expand and finance business ventures with the knowledge, tools and guidance needed to succeed. Services are complimentary and available to the public regardless of where you bank.

Check out Zions Bank’s online Business Resource Center, which includes business templates, financial calculators and expert columns.

Loans are subject to credit approval. Terms and conditions apply. See a banker for details.

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